Tuesday, September 18, 2018

An EveryDay Thing by Nancy Richardson - #Poetry #Review


I've read a lot of blurbs and reviews on this collection. Most of them say raw, angry, etc. True. Many of the poems are angry. How can one not be angry about the Kent State shootings in 1970? There are several poems surrounding that event, and then some that seem to regard climate change, and even elections. The RESIST part of myself felt very pleased by the examination of these events in such subtle yet telling ways.

However, I must bring up the poignant and beautiful aspect of many of the poems here. I was particularly touched by the poems about her sister (or a sister?). I am very close with my sister so these really hit home. Portland, June 1991, The Fire's Edge (shared below), and Later...

The Fire's Edge

The Portland taxi wheels crunch on gravel
and I touch her as our reflections bleed down
the wet window glass. I will not see her again.
Sisters, we were born on the fire's edge
in a town of sulfur dust, metal water. At night
we sweated the uphill climb to see
the open hearth's unholy glow on the horizon.
On the old mattress with the sinking center
we talked of our futures and who would love us.
The screen door slaps. I turn, see the window,
her face melting in watercolor light.

Finally, there's the poem River...so exquisite in its simplicity, it's one of the most beautiful poems I've ever read. It all comes back to love. No matter who, or what, you love...love is love.

River

A man I knew once told me
that we are small leaves 
flowing downstream in a river
of space and time, our destination 
love--perhaps unreachable.
But now I see that the river is love
and we are words 
and the words are stones
pushed by the flow, moving,
wedged, or sinking in the silt.

I recommend this collection to anyone who loves poetry; Poetry that really makes you think.

About the Book
Nancy Richardson’s poems concern coming of age in the rust-belt of Ohio during a period of decay of the physical and political structures that made the region once solid and predictable. Her poems chart the shifting of the foundations upon which a life is built and the unpredictability of events that have profound personal and political consequences, including the shootings at Kent State University.

EARLY PRAISE
“Without poetry there would be no history,” wrote Paz, and Nancy Richardson superb book is proof enough. Anchored in the tragic events of Kent State, but radiating out to examine other forms of violence and relationships, Nancy Richardson’s poems speak eloquently and superbly to our own times. To do this she counterpoints the “everyday” whether that be an apt observation or a family event and its unique quality. So for instance, in “Queen Anne’s Lace,” set suddenly in the midst all this, she understands its “Delicacy / in the midst of loss,” but does not stop there, rather moves on to what good poetry should do—heal—as she ends it by noting “these petals of silk, this snowflake of stars,” an image that lets us transcend but not avoid the real world she describes. This is an important book, deftly written, a must read.

–Richard Jackson, UTNAA Distinguished Professor of English, Vermont College

These terse, understated poems pack a great emotional punch. Unerringly, Nancy Richardson hits the mortal vulnerabilities and the socio-political ones. This book is a history of the grievous wastefulness of a post-WWII United States that in many ways has gone to hell; yet there is no accusation here. Rather, there is the poetry of what has been shattered—be it in a motorcycle accident or voter fraud or the Kent State killings—and cannot be put back together.

–Baron Wormser, Author of Tom o’ Vietnam and former Poet Laureate of Maine

Nancy Richardson‘s voice is clearly heard through this beautiful and insightful collection. She makes the ordinary extraordinary with her choice of rich images.

–Madeleine Kunin: Author of My Coming of Age: My journey through the Eighties

About the Author
Nancy Richardson’s poems concern coming of age in the rust-belt of Ohio during a period of decay of the physical and political structures that made the region once solid and predictable. These are poems that chart the shifting of the foundations upon which a life is built and the unpredictability of events that have profound personal and political consequences.

Nancy Richardson’s poems have appeared in journals and anthologies. Her first chapbook, Unwelcomed Guest, was published in 2013 and concerned coming of age in the rust-belt of Ohio and the shootings at Kent State University. The second chapbook, The Fires’ Edge, extended that subject matter in elegies and reflections of living in that place and time. Her latest book, An EveryDay Thing, carries her previous narratives into adulthood with a look back at her history and what that history has created in her. Nancy has an MFA in Writing from Vermont college where she focused on poetry in response to injustice. She has served on the Board of the Frost Place in Franconia, New Hampshire.

Purchase copies here from Finishing Line Press: https://www.finishinglinepress.com/product/an-everyday-thing-by-nancy-richardson/




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Thursday, September 13, 2018

#CatThursday - #Authors and #Cats (76) Andrzej Stasiuk


Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the wonders and sometime hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite lolcat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Share the link to your post with your comment below.

The second Cat Thursday of each month is Authors and Cats Thursday. Each time I will feature an author with their cat(s), pictured with a cat(s), or guest posts by cat loving authors who also (sometimes) write about cats.


Andrzej Stasiuk, born September 25, 1960, is one of the most successful and internationally acclaimed contemporary Polish writers, journalists and literary critics. He is best known for his travel literature and essays that describe the reality of Eastern Europe and its relationship with the West.

After being dismissed from secondary school, Stasiuk dropped out also from a vocational school and drifted aimlessly, became active in the Polish pacifist movement and spent one and a half years in prison for deserting the army - as legend has it, in a tank. His experiences in prison provided him with the material for the stories in his literary debut in 1992. Titled Mury Hebronu ("The Walls of Hebron"), it instantly established him as a premier literary talent. After a collection of poems Wiersze miłosne i nie, 1994 ("Love and non-love poems"), Stasiuk's bestselling first full-length novel Biały kruk (English translation as "White Raven" in 2000) appeared in 1995 and consolidated his position among the most successful authors in post-communist Poland.

Long before his literary breakthrough, in 1986, Stasiuk had left his native Warsaw and withdrew to the seclusion of the small hamlet of Czarne in the Beskids, a secluded part of the Carpathian mountain range in the south of Poland. Outside writing, he spends his time breeding sheep. Together with his wife, he also runs his own tiny but, by now, prestigious publishing business Wydawnictwo Czarne, named after its seat. Apart from his own books, Czarne also publishes other East European authors. Czarne also re-published works by the émigré Polish author Zygmunt Haupt, thus initiating Haupt's rediscovery in Poland.

While White Raven had a straight adventure plot, Stasiuk's subsequent writing has become increasingly impressionistic and concentrated on atmospheric descriptions of his adopted mental home, the provincial south-east of Poland and Europe, and the lives of its inhabitants. Opowieści Galicyjskie ("Tales of Galicia"), one of several works available in English (among the others are "White Raven", "Nine", "Dukla," "Fado," and "On the Road to Babadag") conveys a good impression of the specific style developed by Stasiuk. A similar text is Dukla (1997), named after a small town near his home. Dukla achieved Stasiuk's breakthrough in Germany and helped built him the most appreciative reader-base outside of Poland, although a number of Stasiuk's books have been translated into several other languages. (from Goodreads)




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Thursday, September 6, 2018

#CatThursday - Even more mischief! #cats


Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the wonders and sometime hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite lolcat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Share the link to your post with your comment below.

I just love all the mischief!








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Friday, August 31, 2018

Readers Imbibing Peril 13 #RIPXIII & #SomethingWickedFall 48 Hour Kick-Off #Readathon


From the new dedicated blog...

Welcome to the THIRTEENTH year of Readers Imbibing Peril, or RIP, as it is affectionately called. For the last 13 years, we here at RIP headquarters have embraced the spookiness of the seasons’ change.

The purpose of the R.I.P. Challenge is to enjoy books that could be classified as:

Mystery.
Suspense.
Thriller.
Dark Fantasy.
Gothic.
Horror.
Supernatural.

Basically, read scary. Yay!

The levels of participation (participate in one, all, or various) are:

Peril the First: Read four books, any length, that you feel fit.

I'm doing this level. My list:

The Narrows, Ronald Malfi
A Head Full of Ghosts, Paul Tremblay
The Secret History, Donna Tartt
The Bank of the River, Michael Richan
The Vampire Armand, Anne Rice
Bird Box, Josh Malerman
Shirley: A Novel, Susan Scarf Merrell
Something Wicked This Way Comes, Ray Bradbury

This is more than four, but I'm working on a challenge so...

Peril the Second: Read two books of any length that you believe fit.

Peril the Third: We all want you to participate. This Peril involves reading one book that fits.

Peril of the Short Story: Self explanatory...read short stories.

I'll be reading Gothic short stories in September during my Something Wicked This Fall Comes event at my sister blog, Castle Macabre

I'll be picking choosing stories from the following:
Edgar Allan Poe (of course)
M.R. James
Shirley Jackson
Algernon Blackwood
H.P. Lovecraft

There's a great list of Gothic fiction on Goodreads here.

Peril on the Screen: Again, self explanatory...watch scary TV shows/movies.

Horror movies and shows are my favorite so this is a no-brainer!

Movies/Shows I will be seeing/watching for sure...
Halloween
The Nun
The Haunting of Hill House (new series)

Peril of the Review: Submit a short review of any book you read (they may even post it on the blog).

I'll try!

I've participated in this challenge since 2009, so 10 of the 13 years. I'm stoked, and it goes along nicely with my scary Fall event at Castle Macabre and the FrightFall Readathon in October at Seasons of Reading.


Coming to Castle Macabre tomorrow...Something Wicked This Fall Comes! We are kicking off with a 48 Hour Readathon hosted at Seasons of Reading. Find out all the details for the Fall event here. Sign up for the 48 Hour Readathon here


I'll be reading scary books from my RIP list above. Will probably start with The Narrows, but not sure. 

Hope you will join us!



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Thursday, August 30, 2018

#CatThursday - Mischief #Cats


Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the wonders and sometime hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite lolcat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Share the link to your post with your comment below.








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Thursday, August 23, 2018

#CatThursday - #Cats in #Art (32) Sophie Gengembre Anderson 1823-1903


Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the wonders and sometime hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite lolcat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Share the link to your post with your comment below.


An Opportune Moment


Awakening-1881

Her Favorite Pets




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Sunday, August 19, 2018

Bout of Books 23 #Readathon


I sign up for this and usually fail, but there just might be a twist this time. I've decided to start a personal Daily Reading Challenge to challenge myself to read more, and I'm kicking it off with Bout of Books this week. I have a tab in the menu for daily updates and then I will do a weekly post (probably during A Reading Life) to share what I accomplished each week. Yes, it will probably be embarrassing at first, but I'm willing to deal with a little of that as a way to motivate me to READ MORE!!!

Now, on to the Bout of Books business...

The Bout of Books read-a-thon is organized by Amanda Shofner and Kelly Rubidoux Apple. It is a week long read-a-thon that begins 12:01am Monday, August 20th and runs through Sunday, August 26th in whatever time zone you are in. Bout of Books is low-pressure. There are challenges, giveaways, and a grand prize, but all of these are completely optional. For all Bout of Books 23 information and updates, be sure to visit the Bout of Books blog. - From the Bout of Books team

I'm not going to set up any big reading plans, and I'm not sure how often I'll update, but these are the books I'm currently reading and plan to continue, and hopefully finish, during the readathon (except for War and Peace, as it's a year long read-along I'm hosting at Lit Collective, one that I'm horribly behind on 😑).

Ombria in Shadow, Patricia A. McKillip
The Anomaly, Michael Rutger
Northanger Abbey, Jane Austen
War and Peace, Tolstoy

I'm also listening to a Discovery of Witches (Deborah Harkness) on audio.

If my daily reading challenge goes well, I may be able to start another book this week. Here's hoping!




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Friday, August 17, 2018

The Actual 9 Year #Blogiversary of True Book Addict


Yes, I'm almost two weeks late AND I think part of that is because...I celebrated the wrong damn blogiversary last year. I started this blog on August 5, 2009. 2009 to 2017 is not nine years, it's eight! Oh dear.


Anyway, this is officially nine years of blogging here and though I've slowed down, I'm not tired of it. It's my own little corner of the web and it's here when I feel like sharing about books and cats and whatever else. I'm not going to have any fanfare this year. That can be next year when it will be 10 YEARS! Wow!

A big thank you to everyone who loyally reads my blog. I appreciate you so much. This blog has been instrumental in opening my world to so many like-minded people who I now consider the best of friends. What greater reward could there be?





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Thursday, August 16, 2018

#CatThursday - More #Kittens


Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the wonders and sometime hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite lolcat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Share the link to your post with your comment below.

I thought it was time for some kittens. We need the cuteness to distract us from the woes of the world. 












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Thursday, August 9, 2018

#CatThursday - #Authors and #Cats (75) Tasha Tudor


Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the wonders and sometime hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite lolcat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Share the link to your post with your comment below.

The second Cat Thursday of each month is Authors and Cats Thursday. Each time I will feature an author with their cat(s), pictured with a cat(s), or guest posts by cat loving authors who also (sometimes) write about cats.



Tasha Tudor, (Starling Burgess), American children’s book illustrator and author (born Aug. 28, 1915, Boston, Mass.—died June 18, 2008, Marlboro, Vt.), illustrated nearly 100 books, many of which she also wrote; her artwork frequently shows children in old-fashioned clothing enjoying simple activities in pastoral settings, with intricate page borders of flowers and animals. She was a runner-up for the Caldecott Medal in 1945 for Mother Goose (1944) and in 1957 for the counting book 1 Is One (1956) and received the Catholic Library Association’s Regina Medal in 1971. Tudor debuted as an author-illustrator with Pumpkin Moonshine (1938). Other books include A Tale for Easter (1941), The Dolls’ Christmas (1950), and several books featuring her Corgi dogs, including her final book, Corgiville Christmas (2003). She edited and illustrated anthologies, such as The Tasha Tudor Book of Fairy Tales(1961); provided illustrations for editions of Robert Louis Stevenson’s A Child’s Garden of Verses (1947), Clement Clarke Moore’s The Night Before Christmas (2002), and other classics; and designed greeting cards and prints. Tudor also wrote The Tasha Tudor Cookbook: Recipes and Reminiscences from Corgi Cottage (1993) and other nonfiction books about the 19th-century lifestyle that she adopted in her New England farmhouse. (from Britannica.com)





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Thursday, August 2, 2018

#CatThursday - #Cats bullying dogs (2)


Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the wonders and sometime hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite lolcat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Share the link to your post with your comment below.

Not that I don't like dogs...I do...but I always find these memes so funny, pitting cats and dogs against each other. In my experience, they are usually fast friends.









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Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Classics Club Spin 18 #ccspin

Update: The spin was #9. My selection...drumroll, please...Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen! Perfect for Austen in August!


The 18th Classics Club Spin! My last one didn't go well. Rabbit, Run by John Updike. UGH! Read all about it here.

Here's what you do...list 20 books from your Classics Club list before August 1. The Club will choose a number randomly from 1 - 20 and that number is the one you will read from your list. Fun! The challenge is to read that book by August 31.

Here's mine:

  1. Emma, Jane Austen
  2. Roxana, Daniel Defoe
  3. The Diary of Anne Frank
  4. Cheri (with The Last of Cheri), Colette
  5. The Collector, John Fowles
  6. Murder in the Cathedral, T.S. Eliot
  7. Cranford, Elizabeth Gaskell
  8. The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde
  9. Northanger Abbey, Jane Austen
  10. The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath
  11. The Martian Chronicles, Ray Bradbury
  12. Frankenstein, Mary Shelley
  13. Something Wicked This Way Comes, Ray Bradbury
  14. The Painted Veil, W. Somerset Maugham
  15. The Age of Innocence, Edith Wharton
  16. In Cold Blood, Truman Capote
  17. Brideshead Revisited, Evelyn Waugh
  18. Roderick Hudson, Henry James
  19. The Princess of Cleves, Madame de Lafayette
  20. Mansfield Park, Jane Austen

Since my reading schedule is already crammed full, all of these pretty much scare me. lol



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