Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Robert Stephen Parry's Elizabeth: The Virgin Queen and the Men who Loved Her - Review and {Giveaway}


My thoughts
There are a few authors that I count among my favorites in the historical fiction genre and this author is one of them. He has a unique voice in the genre and his books always tell their stories in an interesting and engaging way. In this slim volume, he incorporates fiction alongside non-fiction seamlessly. And he has brought us full circle back to the subject of his excellent novel, Virgin and the Crab...his beloved Elizabeth I.

I think I hearken a kind of kinship with this author due to our mutual love for Elizabeth I. And he really brings what I believe to be her true character to the forefront in this book. Elizabeth loved her men and here we are given biographical accounts of each of these men, followed by a vignette of Elizabeth and each man (and one of the man's wives) interacting. These are short sketches and yet they really bring forward in authenticity what these intimate interactions must have truly been like. Perhaps the genuine article of Elizabeth is best captured in various quotes and passages throughout the book. There were several that I really enjoyed. I will share one of them here:

"Well, I also have a formula of my own, Bess - a very special one concerning how the court of England might survive and function under its present climate. For yes, it is true, inevitably I have about me men who also subdue each day their scheming for my approbation. That is how I have kept the gift of peace for the people of this nation for so many decades. That is my formula. And do you think I do not contemplate the weakness of the argument from time to time, as well? Do you think I do not weigh each day in the balance those forces of right and wrong - of tolerance on the one hand for those who are virtuous, and retribution on the other for those who are evil? Every day I must seek that balance. A thousand eyes see everything I do and judge me. I have no life, no privacy, no joy. And yet because I am a woman, when they come to me, even the most powerful men are tamed. They seek for a moment, instead of gold and riches, the approval of their Gloriana, their Virgin Queen. They wait for a smile or touch of my hand as I pass, and live here in a place where the poet is as worthy as the soldier; where a master of music is as treasured as he who would forge a cannon - and they must lift their snouts from the trough occasionally in order to do so. That is how it works, Bess - the charade and the festival of the Virgin Queen."

This quote completely captures what Elizabeth's reign must truly have been like. It is obvious that Elizabeth held the happiness of her people and the peace of the land in the highest regard over everything else. I always feel that Elizabeth was a keen observer of her father's rule, and the history of his reign. How he jeopardized so much for his personal predilections in the guise of seeking an heir must have appeared to her keen mind a mistake she did not want to make in her own reign. Again, it is these determinations and conclusions the reader is able to make of Elizabeth's mind from reading this excellent volume.

I highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in history and historical fiction.

Read my reviews of Robert Stephen Parry's Virgin and the Crab and The Arrow Chest.

About the book
The Elizabethan golden age was peopled by a court of flamboyant and devoted men - each one unique, ambitious and talented. At its centre was a woman, Elizabeth, the Tudor princess who succeeded to the throne of England in 1558 and who vowed to her Parliament to remain unwed and a Virgin Queen for the rest of her life. How did such a diverse group of red-blooded men view their ?Gloriana?? What were their aims and intentions? What were their dreams? And just how did Elizabeth manage to control and manipulate them? A unique blend of fact and fiction brings the Elizabethan court and its inhabitants to life in an evocative series of biographical sketches that will inform and entertain in equal measure.


About the author
Robert Stephen Parry is a UK writer of historical fiction with special interests in Tudor, Elizabethan and Georgian England; Victorian Gothic and Pre-Raphaelite art. A fresh and original voice in historical fiction, his work combines reality, mystery and imagination within a well-researched and vivid historical setting. Publications to date include:

2014 'ELIZABETH - The Virgin Queen and the Men who Loved Her.'
2013 'WILDISH - A Story Concerning Different Kinds of Love'
2011 'THE ARROW CHEST - A Victorian Mystery'
2009 'VIRGIN AND THE CRAB - Sketches, Fables and Mysteries from the Early Life of John Dee and Elizabeth Tudor'


Follow the instructions on the Rafflecopter form below to enter to win a copy of Elizabeth - Kindle or Print, winner's choice. Open internationally!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

A copy of this book was sent to me in exchange for an honest review. I was not monetarily compensated for providing it.

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Monday, September 1, 2014

A Reading Life (34) -- Fall is Here (sort of)!!!


It's Fall, it's Fall! Well, it is for me. I know the official date isn't until September 23, but as soon as September 1st rolls around, my Fall kicks off. Who else is excited for everything Autumn?

Currently reading:
March, Geraldine Brooks
The Invention of Wings, Sue Monk Kidd (almost finished!)
People of the Book, Geraldine Brooks
The Ancestor's Tale, Richard Dawkins
The House of Seven Gables, Nathaniel Hawthorne
All the Pretty Horses, Cormac McCarthy

Audio:
The Essential Edgar Allan Poe (Stories, Poems, Biography)

Family Reading Project (20 minutes daily, alternating titles):
The Crystal CaveMary Stewart (on page 196)
Jurassic Park, Michael Crichton (on page 131)

One movie/One TV show I like right now:
I saw As Above So Below on Sunday. The kick off to my horror film season. Another reason why this time of the year is my favorite. With Halloween not far off, the horror movies are coming out in droves! Anyway, this was an excellently scary movie. 
New show last week on BBC America, Intruders. Kind of has an X Files feel to it so I'm loving it. And, of course, Doctor Who! I'm loving the new Doctor. Peter Capaldi has edge. Who knew!? (I know. This is two shows. Couldn't help it!)

Life:
So, turns out Gabe did not make the Donelson Middle football team, but he got on our local team, the Donelson-Hermitage Warriors. Yay! His first game was Saturday and it was a rainy game. He's jumping right in and getting his feet wet...and loving it. I'm so proud! Here's a pic of him in his uniform...


On a personal note, I've been out to sing karaoke two weekends in a row! Last weekend was my cousin Carmen's birthday and then this week, my cousin Kelsey was visiting from Memphis. I love to sing so it was a lot of fun. I didn't know how to act, going out two weekends back to back. Great times!

Read-a-Longs: 
The read-a-long for The House of Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne kicked off today, in conjunction with Gothic September at Castle Macabre. You can find out all the details HERE.

I'm thinking about hosting a read-a-long of either Memnoch the Devil or The Vampire Armand by Anne Rice in October at Castle Macabre, in conjunction with The Never-Ending Anne Rice Challenge. Still deciding!

TuesBookTalk - We are reading two non-fiction books in September. Group members can read either/or...or both. Unbroken by Laura Hilenbrand and The Ancestor's Tale by Richard Dawkins. As you can see above, I'm reading Ancestor's Tale. We are currently voting on our horror read for October. I picked some good and scary ones this time. 

Lit Collective - we are reading and discussing the works of Geraldine Brooks in August ...I extended this through September. Everyone is behind on the reading.
March
Caleb's Crossing
People of the Book

Nominations will soon be open for our theme read in March.

Reading Challenges:

R.I.P. IX!!! Who else looks forward to this every year? And the artwork for the challenge is off the hook! Click here to visit my sign up post at my challenge blog.



My upcoming events (challenges, read-a-thons, other reading events):

Banned Books Week commentary on this blog in September (possibly)
Gothic September at Castle Macabre
FrightFall Read-a-Thon at Seasons of Reading (end Sept/early Oct)
Season of the Witch at Castle Macabre (Oct)

Recent Book Acquisitions (including library check-outs):

For review:
The Tiger Queens, Stephanie Thornton
Inglorious Royal Marriages, Leslie Carroll

From friends:
The Firebird, Susanna Kearsley
We Were Liars, E. Lockhart

Won:
China Dolls, Lisa See (???)
When The United States Spoke French, Francois Furstenberg (from Wonders & Marvels)

Library Sale:
Black Coffee, Agatha Christie (adapted by Charles Osborne)
Gad's Hall and The Haunting of Gad's Hall (2 in 1), Norah Lofts
The Concubine, Norah Lofts
Postcards, E. Annie Proulx
The House at Riverton, Kate Morton
Girl in a Blue Dress, Gaynor Arnold


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Friday, August 29, 2014

HFVBT: Alison Atlee's The Typewriter Girl -- Audio Book Review


My thoughts
I have mixed feelings about this book. While I really enjoyed the narration by noted narrator, Rosalyn Landor, I found some of the themes in this book to be lacking. For one thing, the main character, Betsey, is trying to make a new start in life, but her past comes back to haunt her. And what is that past? A man...a bad relationship. So what does she do? She gets involved with another man who "rescues her" from said man from the past. It's all very pat. And far be it for me to object to foul language when I have the mouth of a sailor, but I just could not get beside the constant use of the f-bomb. Did they really say it that much during the Victorian era? It just rang false to me. 

However, I'm not going to be completely negative in my review. Despite the false feel of the foul language, I do feel that the author captured the era very well. And I do believe that one does not have to be completely in love with the characters to like the book. I was a bit reminded of Michel Faber's Crimson Petal and the White. The characters in that book are not likable, yet it's a terrific book. But in Faber's book, we know why the characters are the way they are. We know what motivates them. In this book, the motivation behind the characters was not so obvious. 

I've seen mixed reviews about this book so I'm not going to say don't read it. You just might be one of the people that really likes it. 

About the book
Audible Audio Book Edition: Audible.com
Release Date: April 4, 2014
Listening Length: 12 hours and 39 minutes
Publisher: Audible Studios
Language: English
ASIN: B00JH0L9HW
Genre: Historical Fiction

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A Pub­lish­ers Weekly Best Books of the Year pick: The Type­writer Girl is a “spec­tac­u­lar debut, set in a per­fectly real­ized Vic­to­rian England.”

When Bet­sey Dob­son dis­em­barks from the Lon­don train in the sea­side resort of Idensea, all she owns is a small valise and a canary in a cage. After an attempt to forge a let­ter of ref­er­ence she knew would be denied her, Bet­sey has been fired from the typ­ing pool of her pre­vi­ous employer. Her vig­or­ous protest left one man wounded, another jilted, and her char­ac­ter per­ma­nently besmirched.

Now, with­out money or a ref­er­ence for a new job, the future looks even bleaker than the deba­cle she left behind her.

But her life is about to change … because a young Welsh­man on the rail­road quay, wait­ing for another woman, is the one finally will­ing to believe in her.

Mr. Jones is inept in mat­ters of love, but a genius at things mechan­i­cal. In Idensea, he has con­structed a glit­ter­ing pier that astounds the wealthy tourists. And in Bet­sey, he rec­og­nizes the ideal tour man­ager for the Idensea Pier & Plea­sure Build­ing Company.

After a life­time of guard­ing her secrets and break­ing the rules, Bet­sey becomes a force to be reck­oned with. Together, she and Mr. Jones must find a way for her to suc­ceed in a soci­ety that would reject her, and fig­ure the price of sur­ren­der­ing to the tides of love.

Praise for The Typewriter Girl

“Atlee’s out¬standing debut unflinchingly explores … the unforgiving man’s world of Victorian England.” –PUBLISHERS WEEKLY (starred review)

“Easily one of the most romantic books I’ll read all year … John and Betsey are compelling and worth rooting for.” –DEAR AUTHOR (a Recommended Read)

“Sweeps readers to a satisfying conclusion.” –LIBRARY JOURNAL

Buy the AudioBook
About the Author
Alison Atlee spent her childhood re-enacting Little Women and trying to fashion nineteenth century wardrobes for her Barbie dolls. Happily, these activities turned out to be good preparation for writing historical novels. She now lives in Kentucky. For more information please visit Alison Atlee's website. You can also connect with her on FacebookTwitterGoogle+Goodreads and Pinterest.


Visit other blogs on the tour--Tour Schedule
Twitter Hashtag: #TypewriterGirlBlogTour #TypewriterGirlBookBlast #HistFic #HistNov

A copy of this book was sent to me in exchange for an honest review. I was not monetarily compensated for providing it.

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Thursday, August 28, 2014

Cat Thursday: Cats in Art (4)


Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the beauty, wonder and hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite lolcat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Enjoy! (share your post in the Mr. Linky below)

Short and sweet this week, but this painting well deserves a spotlight. Don't you think?

Gustave Courbet (French artist, 1819-1877). Woman with a Cat 1864

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Thursday, August 21, 2014

Cat Thursday - What if humans acted like cats?



Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the wonders and sometime hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite LOL cat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Enjoy! (share your post in the Mr. Linky below)

This video is absolutely hilarious! 

Post by BuzzFeed Video.


Recent pics of Alice and Arya with my new smartphone camera. Better pics, but Alice is still hard to see because of her color.



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Wednesday, August 20, 2014

PUYB: Daphne Michaels' The Gifted: How to Live the Life of Your Dreams - Guest Post and Review


Going With Love

A wonderful friend (and one of my biggest fans) handed me a note as I was getting ready to fly to New York to launch my new book The Gifted; How to Live the Life of Your Dreams at the International Book Expo. Scribbled on a scrap of paper was written, “Be bold, be beautiful, be a lil’ sassy and sexy (you’ve got it, use it) and mainly go with love.”

I believe I speak for many writers when I say that promoting our own work is a daunting task. When I launched my first book nearly eight years ago I faced the question of how to market something that came straight from my heart. At that time I felt shy about getting the word out that I had published a book. Today, I realize that I could only market something that comes from my heart. I am eager to share that I have written a book to help others on their paths of personal development and spiritual growth. I am eager to say, as a psychotherapist with over 25 years experience, this is a book that will help.

This year at the International Book Expo someone had a great idea to do something new and wild. While the Book Expo has traditionally been limited to trade professionals, this year they opened the last day to the public. It was amazing to be a part of this experience! One day people were holding business meetings and talking shop, and the next day up to ten thousand readers made there way through long lines to be a part of the international reading experience. From tiny children being carried by adults to teens hoping to meet their favorite authors, people looking for gifts for loved ones and book club members deciding on their next selection — having readers at the event was incredible. As a steady stream of book fans pushed through joyfully crowded isle ways their smiles, appreciation and words of encouragement vaporized any sense of doubt I may have had about book marketing. I realized in that moment that writers and readers are inextricably linked by a bridge that connects us from heart to heart and gratitude that travels in both directions.

My thoughts on the book
The Gifted does a great job of outlining the tools we need to live the life of our dreams, but unless we are an expert carpenter, we need the instructions on how to pull all of it together and put it to use in our lives. While this books is beautifully written and gives us good examples of what we need - awareness, stillness, harmony, etc. - and don't need - being ruled by ego, self-doubt, fear, etc. - in our lives, I was really looking for more guidance. I'm sure this would click immediately for people who are more voiced in this subject matter already, but for someone like me who is looking for more instruction, it fell short. I feel that for someone who is seeking a clear approach, the books needs more concrete ways of putting these concepts into practice in our daily lives. Perhaps some questions at the end of each chapter, or some exercises and examples to make the reader more of a participant. In the end, the reader may get that these concepts are important to living the life of your dreams, but may end up asking, "Where do I go from here?"

About the Book:
In The Gifted: How to Live the Life of Your Dreams author, speaker and licensed psychotherapist Daphne Michaels celebrates the nine gifts that are our birthright, guiding readers in how to recognize and use them to transform their lives. In her author's preface, Michaels reveals how her own journey of life transformation began when she was young and realized that human existence wore two conflicting faces--one of love and joy, and one of fear and despair. She decided then to commit her life to reconciling these two visions because she knew that, irreconcilable though they seemed, together these two faces held the secret to living a life of endless possibility and authentic happiness. Her personal journey and formal education in social science, human services and integral psychology led to the founding of the Daphne Michaels Institute, which has helped hundreds of men and women design the lives of their dreams.

In The Gifted, Michaels shows us that the first three “gifts” we must recognize and embrace within us if we are to re-design our lives are Awareness, Potential and Stillness. These three allow us to identify and use the remaining six with a life-changing power: Disharmony, Harmony, Ease, Clarity, Freedom and Engagement. Each of these six relies on the “essential three” for its own power to change our lives, and each has its own gifts--its “children.” By approaching the nine gifts with real-world metaphors, Michaels answers in easily understood ways what for many readers have been lingering questions about personal transformation—such as how it works, what kind of commitment it takes, and why, if we’re committed, real transformation becomes inevitable—and addresses obstacles that readers may have encountered in the past in trying to reach in life a happiness every human deserves.

While the human universe’s face of love is celebrated in The Gifted, so is the face of fear that haunted a young girl decades ago. As Michaels shows us in her book, even Disharmony—the “quagmire” of life born of the human ego’s fear, defenses, delusions and despair—is a gift, too, and one as important as the others if we know how to see it clearly and use it. Once we understand Disharmony, we are ready to understand the real purpose of Harmony in our lives. Disharmony does not need to rule us. It is ours to use as we design the lives of our dreams.

The final gift in The Gifted, Michaels tells us, is the gift of Engagement. Engagement—with the universe and with ourselves—allows us to use all of the other gifts with more power and joy than we ever imagined possible.

That mountaintop decision never left me. It drove my life’s work and over the years led me to understand that there are gifts – nine of them, in fact – that we are all born with but rarely experience in their full glory and potential. These gifts – which make each and every one of us “The Gifted” of this book’s title – are the keys to living lives of endless possibilities and, in turn, achieving an authentic happiness that cannot be lost. They are, in other words, the keys to achieving the life of our dreams. 

Purchase your copy:
AMAZON 


About the Author
Daphne Michaels is an author, speaker and licensed psychotherapist whose institute has helped hundreds of women and men transform their lives through the "gifts" every human being is born with. Daphne began her own journey of transformation at a young age, pursued it fearlessly, and later studied formally in the fields of social science, human services and integral psychology. The Gifted: How to Live the Life of Your Dreams launches both Daphne Michaels Books and The Gifted series, whose goal it is to share with the widest audience possible the principles that guide the Daphne Michaels Institute. Daphne's earlier book, Light of Our Times, featured her conversations with such international figures in the fields of spirituality and personal development as Ram Dass, Julia Cameron, Dr. Masaru Emoto, and Thomas Moore.

Visit her website at www.daphnemichaels.com.
Connect & Socialize!
TWITTER | FACEBOOK

A copy of this book was sent to me in exchange for an honest review. I was not monetarily compensated for providing it.

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Monday, August 18, 2014

A Reading Life (33)


I thought long and hard on whether to participate in Bout of Books this week, but ultimately decided that I just don't have time. I know...me? Pass up a read-a-thon? What is this world coming to?!

Currently reading:
March, Geraldine Brooks
The Invention of Wings, Sue Monk Kidd
People of the Book, Geraldine Brooks
The Unholy, Paul DeBlassie III (review on 8/21)
The Gifted: How to Live the Life of Your Dreams, Daphne Michaels (review on 8/20)

Audio:
The Typewriter Girl, Alison Atlee

Family Reading Project (20 minutes daily, alternating titles):
The Crystal CaveMary Stewart (on page 177)
Jurassic Park, Michael Crichton (on page 111)

One movie/One TV show I like right now:
I saw The Giver on Saturday. I really liked it (and no, I haven't read the book...yet). It was actually an emotional movie for me. Very touching and meaningful subject matter.
The Leftovers - who else can't wait to figure out what the hell is going on? Mind blowing!

Life:
Gabe is on the Middle School football team. The Donelson Middle Jets. Not sure what position he will be playing, but I'm very excited for him. Just not sure if it's going to interfere with his music lessons at W.O. Smith Music School. I hope not.

I was given another client today so I now have five clients as a virtual assistant with Contemporary VA, along with my author client, Rebecca Hazell, independently. I'm getting ready to be even more busy, if that's even possible.

Read-a-Longs: 
I'm hosting a read-a-long of The House of Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne during Gothic September at Castle Macabre.

I'm thinking about hosting a read-a-long of either Memnoch the Devil or The Vampire Armand by Anne Rice in October at Castle Macabre, in conjunction with The Never-Ending Anne Rice Challenge. Will make a decision on that soon.

TuesBookTalk - We will be reading two non-fiction books in September. Group members can read either/or...or both. Unbroken by Laura Hilenbrand and The Ancestor's Tale by Richard Dawkins. In October, we always read a horror novel so I'm thinking I'm going to pick some really scary ones for us to vote on. 

Lit Collective - we are reading and discussing the works of Geraldine Brooks in August
March
Caleb's Crossing
People of the Book

Nominations will soon be open for our theme read in March.

My upcoming events (challenges, read-a-thons, other reading events):

Banned Books Week commentary on this blog in September (possibly)
Gothic September at Castle Macabre
FrightFall Read-a-Thon at Seasons of Reading (end Sept/early Oct)
Season of the Witch at Castle Macabre (Oct)

Recent Book Acquisitions (including library check-outs):

James A. Michener's Writer's Handbook - from Paperback Swap
Death Comes to Pemberley, P.D. James - library

And I got a new Kindle Fire HD!


What's going on in your Reading Life?

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Thursday, August 14, 2014

Cat Thursday - Authors and Cats (35)


Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the wonders and sometime hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite LOL cat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Enjoy! (share your post in the Mr. Linky below)

The second Cat Thursday of each month is Authors and Cats Thursday. Each time I will feature an author and their cat(s).

I'm so behind this week! I haven't even had the time to visit your posts from last week. I'm so sorry! I will have to do double duty in the next couple of days.

This month's author is P.D. James who celebrated her 94th birthday on August 3. This is a drawing of her with her cat by New York Times Artist David Levine. Brilliant! 


About the author
P. D. James is the author of twenty books, most of which have been filmed and broadcast on television in the United States and other countries. She spent thirty years in various departments of the British Civil Service, including the Police and Criminal Law Department of Great Britain's Home Office. She has served as a magistrate and as a governor of the BBC. In 2000 she celebrated her eightieth birthday and published her autobiography, Time to Be in Earnest. The recipient of many prizes and honors, she was created Baroness James of Holland Park in 1991. She lives in London and Oxford.

Awards: International Crime Writing Hall of Fame 2008; Grand Master Award from Mystery Writers of America, 1999; Diamond Dagger from British Crime Writers' Association, 1987.

Author of Death Comes To Pemberley, Children of Men and many more.

Which reminds me...I simply must read Death Comes to Pemberley! It's coming to Masterpiece on PBS at the end of October/early November. Have you seen this?! 




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Monday, August 11, 2014

A Reading Life (32) - Pick-Your-Thon Wrap-Up and my Classics Club Spin Book


Currently reading
March, Geraldine Brooks
The Invention of Wings, Sue Monk Kidd
People of the Book, Geraldine Brooks
The Unholy, Paul DeBlassie III

Audio
The Typewriter Girl, Alison Atlee

Family Reading Project (20 minutes daily, alternating titles)
The Crystal CaveMary Stewart (on page 166)
Jurassic Park, Michael Crichton (on page 101)

One movie/One TV show I like right now
Saw Hercules over the weekend and I REALLY liked it. Pleasantly surprised and greatly entertained!
The Knick - Clive Owen is brilliant, as always. Seems like it's going to be a great show.

Life
The boys started school last week at their new school. They are now attending their zoned school and I think it's a good thing. Gabe won't be under constant scrutiny and on a highly positive note, I will have loads of stress off of me since I won't be doing so much driving. Their school is about five minutes down the street. Yay!

Sad day in our world today, as the beloved Robin Williams has passed away. He apparently had long been suffering from depression and took his own life. We must remember to be kind to one another. We have no idea what another person might be going through. That fact makes kindness all the more important in this world. Rest in Peace, gentle soul. You will be missed.

Read-a-Longs 
I'm hosting a read-a-long of The House of Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne during Gothic September at Castle Macabre.

TuesBookTalk - We are reading The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd this month and we're currently voting on a non-fiction title for September. Right now at TuesBookTalk, we are voting on our non-fiction title for September. I'm considering having two reads in September, as I'm not really in the mood to read Unbroken, even though I've heard it's good. I just don't feel like reading about war right now. I'm not in that frame of mind. The other selection we're voting on is The Ancestor's Tale by Richard Dawkins.

Lit Collective - we are reading and discussing the works of Geraldine Brooks in August
March
Caleb's Crossing
People of the Book

Nominations will soon be open for our theme read in March.

My upcoming events (challenges, read-a-thons, other reading events)

I have buttons ready for all of my Fall events - just no sign up posts yet. They will be coming soon. In the meantime...





Recent Book Acquisitions

William Shakespeare's The Empire Striketh Back, Ian Doescher - won from Kai/Fiction State of Mind

from Better World Books...
A Visit from the Goon Squad, Jennifer Egan
The Lady of the Rivers, Philippa Gregory
The Legend of Broken, Caleb Carr


Well, I didn't do so hot on The Book Monsters' Pick-Your-Thon. I probably read about 100 pages all total from The Invention of Wings, The Unholy and Elizabeth. And I didn't write one review. #fail It just wasn't my week for reading.


The Classics Club Spin #7 - They randomly picked 17. My number 17 book was...



What's going on in your Reading life?

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Sunday, August 10, 2014

The Classics Club Spin 7 - Let's try this again, shall we?

My lucky Classics Club spin - #17 it is! All the Pretty Horses by Cormac McCarthy


The Classics Club spin...it's time again. Since they started doing this, I've only managed to succeed once with Wide Sargasso Sea on spin 5. We're supposed to challenge ourselves by choosing a mix of titles like 'books I can't wait to read, books I'm dreading, etc.' but since I have so much reading on my plate already for August and September, I'm just going to choose a list of 20 shorter books. We will see how this goes...

  1. The Lambs of London, Peter Ackroyd
  2. A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess
  3. Moravagine, Blaise Cendrars
  4. The Devil and Miss Prym, Paulo Coelho
  5. The Collector, John Fowles
  6. The House of Seven Gables, Nathaniel Hawthorne
  7. Brave New World, Aldous Huxley
  8. What Maisie Knew, Henry James
  9. Frankenstein, Mary Shelley
  10. Slaughterhouse Five, Kurt Vonnegut
  11. Ethan Frome, Edith Wharton
  12. Orlando, Virginia Woolf
  13. The Plague, Albert Camus
  14. Howard's End, E.M. Forster
  15. The Sylph, Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire
  16. She, H. Rider Haggard
  17. All the Pretty Horses, Cormac McCarthy
  18. The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plateh
  19. Perfume, Patrick Suskind
  20. Brideshead Revisited, Evelyn Waugh

What's on your Classics Spin list?


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