Friday, April 19, 2019

Classics Club Spin 20 #ccspin

Maybe this time will be the charm...I've only completed one spin, I think. We shall see what happens this time around. I picked my 20 using Random.org.

  1. Rob Roy, Sir Walter Scott
  2. Orlando, Virginia Woolf
  3. The Age of Innocence, Edith Wharton
  4. The Collector, John Fowles
  5. The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  6. The Mysteries of Udolpho, Ann Radcliffe
  7. In Cold Blood, Truman Capote
  8. Murder in the Cathedral, T.S. Eliot
  9. Women in Love, D.H. Lawrence
  10. The Diary of Anne Frank, Anne Frank 
  11. A Woman of No Importance, Oscar Wilde
  12. The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde
  13. The Sylph, Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire
  14. I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou
  15. The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath
  16. The Woman in White, Wilkie Collins
  17. Cheri (with The Last of Cheri), Colette
  18. Roxana, Daniel Defoe
  19. The Martian Chronicles, Ray Bradbury
  20. The Painted Veil, W. Somerset Maugham



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Thursday, April 18, 2019

#CatThursday - Ever considerate #cats


Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the wonders and sometime hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite lolcat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Share the link to your post with your comment below.







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Thursday, April 11, 2019

#CatThursday - #Authors and #Cats (83) Damien Broderick


Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the wonders and often hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite lolcat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Share the link to your post with your comment below.

The second Cat Thursday of each month is Authors and Cats Thursday. Each time I will feature an author with their cat(s), pictured with a cat(s), or guest posts by cat loving authors who also (sometimes) write about cats.


Damien Francis Broderick (born 22 April 1944) is an Australian science fiction and popular science writer and editor of some 70 books. His science fiction novel The Dreaming Dragons (1980) introduced the trope of the generation time machine, his The Judas Mandala (1982) contains the first appearance of the term "virtual reality" in science fiction, and his 1997 popular science book The Spike was the first to investigate the technological singularity in detail. (from Wikipedia)



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Saturday, April 6, 2019

A Reading Life (52) - April #reading plans, #readathons and short #reviews


April already and it's readathon time! My Spring into Horror Readathon (at Seasons of Reading) is in full swing, going on the whole month of April, and today it's time for Dewey's 24 Hour Readathon. Last time I participated in October, I didn't have any plans on Saturday so I was able to do the whole 24 hours (well, I stayed home anyway...I didn't manage to read for 24 hours). This time is a different story because I'm going to see Pet Sematary. So excited! I still should be able to get some good reading time in though.

Before I get to my readathon reading plans, let me share what I read in March. I managed to read three full books! Joy in the Morning by Betty Smith, Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen (audio), and The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton. I'm still working on Suetonius' The Twelve Caesars and Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake.

My brief thoughts on my March reads...


Joy in the Morning

My mom told me many years ago I needed to read this. Can't believe I waited so long. Wonderful book. Annie was such a great character. A lot of her traits reminded me of myself. The way her mind worked; her sense of optimism, and she was a book lover and writer. This book was just a comfort to read, and though it wasn't a "can't put down" thriller type of book, I still found myself wanting to keep reading each time I picked it up.

Challenges read for:
Book Challenge by Erin 10.0


Northanger Abbey

Not my favorite Austen, but definitely worth a read for any Austen fan. Austen had a knack for writing duplicitous characters. Isabella Thorpe, I'm looking at you. I loved all the references to the Gothic novels of the time.

Challenges read for:
Book Challenge by Erin 10.0
The Classics Club


The Miniaturist

If you're a reader who often finds yourself unable to read the book before the movie (or series) is released, take my advice. Never ever let yourself be satisfied with just watching the movie (or series), as excellent as it may be. There's a chance you will miss out if you do. I'm sure many already know this, but it bears repeating. The BBC limited series based on this book was indeed excellent. Yet the book was so much more. The writing brought vividly to mind the scenes, and the characters had so much depth. Based on the real Petronella Oortman (Brandt), the story was fictional, but the large cabinet/doll's house portrayed in the story was one the real Petronella possessed, and one she lavished much money and attention upon. The dollhouse has been on display in the Rijksmuseum Museum in Amsterdam since 1875 (image below). This will always be a memorable historical fiction read for me.


Challenges Read for:
Book Challenge by Erin 10.0

April Reading/Readathon Plans

The #Bookjar and Random Reading Projects are again on hold this month because I'm in the final stretch of  Book Challenge by Erin 10.0 which ends on April 30. I have five books to read to complete the challenge. With the readathons going on, I think I can do it. I hope!

Horror/scary reads for Spring into Horror

Necroscope by Brian Lumley
Florence and Giles by John Harding
The King of Bones and Ashes by J.D. Horn (currently reading)
Good Omens by Gaiman/Pratchett (audio - currently listening)
NOS4A2 by Joe Hill

Non-scary

The Giver by Lois Lowry
The Scapegoat by Daphne Du Maurier (April selection for True Book Talk)
The Twelve Caesars (continue on with)
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood (continue on with) 


What's going on in your reading life?



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Thursday, April 4, 2019

#CatThursday - Plotting #Cats Part Two


Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the wonders and sometime hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite lolcat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Share the link to your post with your comment below.









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Thursday, March 28, 2019

#CatThursday - #Cats in #Art (38) 16th Century, Ulisse Aldrovandi


Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the wonders and sometime hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite lolcat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Share the link to your post with your comment below.


Black Cat - 16th Century

Cat on Ledge with Mouse and Fruit - c. 1580


Seated Cat - 16th Century

'Wild Cat' from Natura Picta



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Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Cover Reveal - RIBBONS OF SCARLET: A Novel of the French Revolution

Six bestselling and award-winning authors bring to life a breathtaking epic novel illuminating the hopes, desires, and destinies of princesses and peasants, harlots and wives, fanatics and philosophers—six unforgettable women whose paths cross during one of the most tumultuous and transformative events in history: the French Revolution.

RIBBONS OF SCARLET: A Novel of the French Revolution, releases October 1st, 2019! Check out the amazing cover below and pre-order your copy today!


About RIBBONS OF SCARLET: A Novel of the French Revolution (Coming October 1, 2019)

Ribbons of Scarlet is a timely story of the power of women to start a revolution—and change the world.

In late eighteenth-century France, women do not have a place in politics. But as the tide of revolution rises, women from gilded salons to the streets of Paris decide otherwise—upending a world order that has long oppressed them.

Blue-blooded Sophie de Grouchy believes in democracy, education, and equal rights for women, and marries the only man in Paris who agrees. Emboldened to fight the injustices of King Louis XVI, Sophie aims to prove that an educated populace can govern itself--but one of her students, fruit-seller Louise Audu, is hungrier for bread and vengeance than learning. When the Bastille falls and Louise leads a women’s march to Versailles, the monarchy is forced to bend, but not without a fight. The king’s pious sister Princess Elisabeth takes a stand to defend her brother, spirit her family to safety, and restore the old order, even at the risk of her head.

But when fanatics use the newspapers to twist the revolution’s ideals into a new tyranny, even the women who toppled the monarchy are threatened by the guillotine. Putting her faith in the pen, brilliant political wife Manon Roland tries to write a way out of France’s blood-soaked Reign of Terror while pike-bearing Pauline Leon and steely Charlotte Corday embrace violence as the only way to save the nation. With justice corrupted by revenge, all the women must make impossible choices to survive--unless unlikely heroine and courtesan’s daughter Emilie de Sainte-Amaranthe can sway the man who controls France’s fate: the fearsome Robespierre.


✭✭✭PRE-ORDER YOUR COPY OF RIBBONS OF SCARLET TODAY✭✭✭


Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound | Apple Books | Kobo

Add to Your Goodreads


About Kate Quinn:

Kate Quinn is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of historical fiction. A native of southern California, she attended Boston University where she earned a Bachelor's and Master's degree in Classical Voice. She has written four novels in the Empress of Rome Saga, and two books in the Italian Renaissance, before turning to the 20th century with "The Alice Network" and "The Huntress." All have been translated into multiple languages. Kate and her husband now live in San Diego with two rescue dogs named Caesar and Calpurnia, and her interests include opera, action movies, cooking, and the Boston Red Sox.

Website | Newsletter | Facebook | Twitter | BookBub |Goodreads



About Stephanie Dray:

Stephanie Dray is a New York Times, Wall Street Journal & USA Today bestselling author of historical women's fiction. Her award-winning work has been translated into eight languages and tops lists for the most anticipated reads of the year. She lives near the nation's capital with her husband, cats, and history books.

Website | Newsletter | Facebook | Twitter | BookBub | Dray & Kamoie Website


About Laura Kamoie:

A New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today bestselling author of historical fiction, Laura Kamoie has always been fascinated by the people, stories, and physical presence of the past, which led her to a lifetime of historical and archaeological study and training. She holds a doctoral degree in early American history from The College of William and Mary, published two non-fiction books on early America, and most recently held the position of Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Naval Academy before transitioning to a full-time career writing genre fiction. She is the author of AMERICA'S FIRST DAUGHTER and MY DEAR HAMILTON, co-authored with Stephanie Dray, allowing her the exciting opportunity to combine her love of history with her passion for storytelling. Laura lives among the colonial charm of Annapolis, Maryland with her husband and two daughters.

Website | Newsletter | Facebook | Twitter | BookBub | Goodreads


About Sophie Perinot:

Sophie Perinot is an award-winning, multi-published author of female-centered historical fiction, who holds both a Bachelors in History and a law degree. With two previous books set in France—during the 13th and 16th centuries—Sophie has a passion for French history that began more than thirty years ago when she first explored the storied châteaux of the Loire Valley. She lives in the Washington DC metropolitan area with her husband, children and a small menagerie of pets.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | BookBub | Goodreads


About Heather Webb:

Heather Webb is the award-winning and international bestselling author of six historical novels set in France, including the upcoming Meet Me in Monaco, set to the backdrop of Grace Kelly’s wedding releasing in summer 2019, and Ribbons of Scarlet, a novel of the French Revolution’s women in Oct 2019. In 2015, Rodin’s Lover was selected as a Goodreads Top Pick, and in 2017, Last Christmas in Paris became a Globe & Mail bestseller and also won the 2018 Women’s Fiction Writers Association STAR Award. Her works have received national starred reviews, and have been sold in over a dozen countries worldwide. When not writing, you may find Heather collecting cookbooks or looking for excuses to travel. She lives in New England with her family and one feisty rabbit.

Website | Newsletter | Facebook | Twitter | BookBub | Goodreads



About E. Knight:

E. KNIGHT is a USA Today bestselling author of rip-your-heart-out historical women’s fiction that crosses the landscapes of Europe. Her love of history began as a young girl when she traipsed the halls of Versailles and ran through the fields in Southern France. She can still remember standing before the great golden palace, and imagining what life must have been like. She is the owner of the acclaimed blog History Undressed. Eliza lives in Maryland atop a small mountain with a knight, three princesses and two very naughty newfies. Visit Eliza at www.eknightauthor.com/eknight, or her historical blog, History Undressed, www.historyundressed.com. You can follow her on Twitter: @EKHistoricalFic, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EKnightAuthor, and Instagram @ElizaKnightFiction.

Website | Newsletter | Facebook | Twitter | BookBub | Goodreads




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Thursday, March 21, 2019

#CatThursday - Sweet Revenge #cats


Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the wonders and sometime hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite lolcat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Share the link to your post with your comment below.

I've had a cat or two take revenge on me. How about you?







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Thursday, March 14, 2019

#CatThursday - #Authors and #Cats (82) John Irving


Welcome to the weekly meme that celebrates the wonders and often hilarity of cats! Join us by posting a favorite lolcat pic you may have come across, famous cat art or even share with us pics of your own beloved cat(s). It's all for the love of cats! Share the link to your post with your comment below.

The second Cat Thursday of each month is Authors and Cats Thursday. Each time I will feature an author with their cat(s), pictured with a cat(s), or guest posts by cat loving authors who also (sometimes) write about cats.

I had no idea he was a cat lover. Love his writing.


John Irving (b. March 2, 1942) was born in Exeter, New Hampshire, in 1942. His first novel, Setting Free the Bears, was published in 1968, when he was twenty-six. He competed as a wrestler for twenty years, and coached wrestling until he was forty-seven.Mr. Irving has been nominated for a National Book Award three times—winning once, in 1980, for his novel The World According to Garp. He received an O. Henry Award in 1981 for his short story “Interior Space.” In 2000, Mr. Irving won the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay for The Cider House Rules. In 2013, he won a Lambda Literary Award for his novel In One Person.

An international writer—his novels have been translated into more than thirty-five languages—John Irving lives in Toronto. His all-time best-selling novel, in every language, is A Prayer for Owen Meany. 

Avenue of Mysteries is his fourteenth novel.
(from Goodreads)





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Tuesday, March 12, 2019

A Reading Life (51) - March #reading plans and February's short #reviews


Wow! It's March. It's Spring Break this week so we have some fun planned. Looking forward to it because we're going to the Frist Art Museum. Might be the last time we visit before we move back to Michigan next year. We're also going to see Captain Marvel tomorrow. I've been hearing great things about it. Reece and I are excited!

In February, I read Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and The Princess of Cleves by Madame de La Fayatte (True Book Talk February Selection). I'm still working on Suetonius' The Twelve Caesars. It's a bit dry so I decided to take a bit longer to read it, and to read it in doses.

My thoughts on February's reads...

Frankenstein

I can't believe I waited so long to read this book. I've read Dracula three times. I recently watched the film, Mary Shelley. I immediately picked this up to read. While somewhat more wordy than Dracula, in my opinion (I enjoy Dracula's epistolary format), I liked its insight and observations on mankind. How we so often have difficulty looking beyond the physical appearance to what the person is like inside. How we judge and underestimate on appearances alone. I would even go so far to say that Shelley's "monster" was symbolic of women and how they were treated in her time. Judged by gender/outward appearance; believed not capable of anything beyond typical womanly tasks. Certainly not capable of writing a novel such as Frankenstein!

I will definitely reread at some point. I bet there is a great audio version available.

Challenges read for:
Book Challenge by Erin 10.0
Classics Club
13 Ways of Looking at the Lifetime Reading Plan
2019 Book to Movie


The Princess of Cleves

A quote from the Madame de La Fayette author page on Goodreads: "... the work is often taken to be the first true French novel and a prototype of the early psychological novel." This was definitely an interesting depiction of the intrigues of the French court, and when I say intrigues, I mean the intrigues of love. Initially, a bit overwhelmed with the multitude of characters described in the novel, I was finally able to keep everyone straight, although with effort. Regarding it being an early psychological novel, I would have to agree. The author was very skillful in depicting the inner workings of the characters' minds, especially those of the Princess of Cleves and the Duc de Nemours.


Challenges read for:
Classics Club


March Reading Plans

I'm not doing the #Bookjar and Random Reading Projects this month because I'm working on Book Challenge by Erin 10.0 which ends on April 30. I need to read three books this month and three next month, plus finish The Twelve Caesars, to complete the challenge (I'm also listening to the Northanger Abbey audio book for this challenge...very close to finishing). Below are the books and Book Challenge prompts I'm reading for this March.


Read a book that is a friend or family member’s favourite...or the favourite book by another participant in this challenge - Joy in the Morning by Betty Smith (one of my mom’s favorites)


Read a book that was made into a movie - The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne

Read a book that is set in Europe - The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton

Also, currently reading Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood, March selection for True Book Talk.


What's going on in your reading life?




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